On the other hand, click the image of the answers suggested in this regard.
Whether or not to accept others regardless of a conservative guess.


19h UTC; WEDNESDAY, 11 JUNE 2014: Your Correspondent understands that British educational authorities will be requiring a "British Values" curriculum starting next school term in schools from Land's End to John O'Groats; this in response to reports of emerging "radicalisation" in certain Islamist-influenced schools in Birmingham and London in particular.

On the other hand, is it safe to suggest that certain aspects of the Christian Homeschooling curriculum--nay, the greater so-called "Christian" educational model in the United States, emphasising an idealised set of "values" over core skills--may itself be radicalised in its own peculiar way? And is it enow to warrant incorporating an ideologically-warped "AmeriKKKan Values" curriculum, one reeking of the jingoistic and solipistic?

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There may be a "dark side" emerging to one David Brat, as upset incumbent House Majority Leader Eric Cantor in yesterday's congressional primaries in Virginia despite having limited campaign resources and "Tea Party"-influenced articles of faith: Witness where Brat, a professor in economics at Randolph-Macon College, is pushing the notion that "Christian Capitalism" is essential to Our National and Sovereign Identity, but without offering any sort of defining characteristics as to what his ideal of "Christian Capitalism" is.

The which Your Correspondent is more than happy to answer for the interim.

Meanwhile, how do we know this Congressional ReoubliKKKan isn't at risk of "Heathering" from the party leadership for his change of heart towards the poor and vulnerable?

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Meanwhile, how many of you have heard this classic in flatulence-based humour, vintage 1945, otherwise known as "The Crepitation Contest"? (You can hear it for yourself by way of the following player; however, please be warned that the content may offend some of especially sensitive feelings):



"'Good food cooked correctly and served tastily.' This is the creed of all chefs au fait." Such described Steve Kogl, one of the chefs on the Great Northern Railway's Oriental Limited, its premiere Chicago-Twin Cities-Pacific Northwest train until the debut of the Empire Builder in 1929, in a 1924 recipe pamphlet which offered a selection of popular recipes from the Oriental Limited's dining cars. And one especially such worth sharing from Mr. Kogl was this one for "Spaghetti a la Glacier Park," submitted for your approval and delectation:
2 oz. bacon, chopped fine
½ oz. garlic, chopped fine
2 oz. ham (fat), chopped fine
1 oz. green pepper, chopped fine
4 oz. onion, chopped fine

Braise all together with ham bone and 1 can of tomatoes, cook for 1 hour, strain and mix with hot spaghetti. Season to taste. Serve in casserole with Parmesan cheese and minced chicken.
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"Tipping Is Not a City in China" was a sign as had prominence at a now-closed restaurant here in Winona as was renowned for its Friday fish fry, and for some reason Your Correspondent still manages to recall same therefrom. I bring this up in light of a story you may have heard on the news about a waitress at a Waffle House location in Raleigh, NC as was initially unable to accept a $1,000 tip left by a patron of hers recently because such was in a form which went against Corporate Policy (i.e., paid via credit card rather than by cash or cheque) ... but later, after the customer was told of the policy, he wrote out a cheque for the tip amount, thus allowing her to keep same.

As a result, corporate policy on tip acceptance has been revised to cover such large tips.



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